With the release of the newest variation of UPR's oil catch can, there are now just enough catch can options out on the market to make things confusing enough that we here at Stage 3 should do a writeup on the subject. The good news is there's only a few different types of catch cans across all of the brands available on the market, so breaking them down isn't overly difficult. We'll use UPR's catch cans as an example. In any case, here's our brief overview of all the current catch can options available here at Stage 3.

2011-2014 F150 3.5L EcoBoost UPR Single-Valve Billet Catch Can

Catch Can Overview

The Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) system on your 2011 to 2014 F150 EcoBoost's 3.5L V6 does its job of clearing crankcase pressure, but it happens to take with it a lot of oil vapor blow-by as a result. While this isn't usually a huge problem in most applications (aside from some octane degradation), all that oil blow-by and atmospheric moisture tends to pool in your turbocharged truck's intercooler, which is one of the causes of the infamous "EcoBoost Shudder". The other issue is valve coking, where your intake valves get coated with sticky oil residue that causes a loss of performance and other problems. Catch cans large alleviate both problems by capturing oil vapor before it gets into your intake stream.

2011-2014 F150 EcoBoost UPR Oil Catch Can with Oil

Basic In-Line Oil Separator

The most simple of the catch cans are those like UPR's original EcoBoost Catch Cans for both the driver's side and passenger's side of the engine. These catch cans have a single inlet and single outlet into their top caps. The top cap of the can is stuffed with metal fibers and filaments. When air from your truck's PCV system enters the can, oil vapor hits the metal inside the cap and then drips down through the trap and into the can's reservoir. While simple and inexpensive, these catch cans aren't the absolute most effective options out on the market, and because they mount in the engine bay, they can be a bit more difficult to empty than other catch cans. Still, they do the job of keeping your intercooler dry and your intake valves un-coked.

2011-2014 F150 EcoBoost UPR Driver's Side Billet Catch Can

Single-Valve Oil Catch Cans

The UPR Single-Valve Catch Cans are a good upgrade over their basic cans, and provide improved oil capturing and a much more ergonomic design. The single valve catch cans feature a three-stage internal oil capturing design where oil enters a pair of specialized chambers that cool, condense, and finally capture oil vapor in its reservoir. The specialized design of the coalescing chambers help prevent any oil vapor from reentering your intake system. The Single-Valve catch can mounts in front of your truck's radiator and comes standard with a petcock on the bottom of the reservoir that makes emptying the can extremely easy. While it doesn't capture the most oil out of all of UPR's options, the Single-Valve cans are a good upgrade over the more basic cans without a huge chunk of change out of your wallet.

2011-2014 F150 3.5L EcoBoost UPR Single-Valve Catch Can

Dual-Valve Catch Can with Clean-Side Separator

The ultimate say when it comes to pulling oil out of your truck's PCV stream is the UPR Dual-Valve Catch Can. This can comes with a Clean-Side Oil Separator, which makes it a catch can within a catch can system. Just like the Single-Valve Can, the Dual-Valve can features a three-stage internal design, but features two inlet ports that bring in PCV oil blow-by from both the passenger's side and driver's side of your truck. The driver's side of the truck also gets a miniature oil separator of its own to efficiently bring oil into the main can. While the Dual-Valve Can's nearly flawless efficiency is very nice indeed, some folks may be put off by the $349.99 base price. However, that seemingly high price gets you a billet catch can, billet clean-side separator, braided hoses, and high-quality hardware making the dual-valve can your best bets for totally solving condensation issues and intake valve buildup.

2011-2014 F150 3.5L EcoBoost UPR Dual-Valve Catch Can

You really can't go wrong with any of these choices, and while we do recommend grabbing a catch can for your truck, you by no means "need" to get one. That being said, new new UPR Single-Valve can is looking like the best buy at the moment, given its excellent balance of efficiency and price point.

6 Comments

Derek Simenac

Date 9/5/2014

waiting for my twin valve can. One thing that was not mentioned in the article is the ecoboost has 10:1 compression ratio which is borderline 91 octane requirement. The oil blow by causes octane degradation which would contribute to the spark plugs wearing prematurely. This simple fix should fix ALL the problems that are plaguing the ecoboost 3.5

Jeremy

Date 8/8/2016

Upon initial installment of my upr dual valve oil catch can I had a ton on oil, and nasty fuel coming out when I would drain it. Recently I have not had a drop coming out for the last couple thousand miles. Is something wrong with my catch can now is there a way to see if everything is working right? Thank you I purchased my catch can from stage 3.

Jeremy

Date 8/8/2016

Upon initial installment of my upr dual valve oil catch can I had a ton on oil, and nasty fuel coming out when I would drain it. Recently I have not had a drop coming out for the last couple thousand miles. Is something wrong with my catch can now is there a way to see if everything is working right? Thank you I purchased my catch can from stage 3.

Stephen Partridge

Date 5/13/2018

I HAVE A 2011 LINCOLN MKT 3.5 TURBO. WHAT OIL CATCH CANS ARE OK? AND DO YOU HAVE A DIAGRAM OF INSTILATION?

Joel T Hicks

Date 7/12/2018

I have a 2011 F150 3.5L ecoboost and I was goin down the road the other day and it flashed low oil pressure. I pulled over on a side road and shut the truck off. After that it wouldn't turn over or anything. I've heard it could be the oil pump or it could be the oil strainer caught some trash. What Do you think it could be? Thanks

Joel T Hicks

Date 7/12/2018

I have a 2011 F150 3.5L ecoboost and I was goin down the road the other day and it flashed low oil pressure. I pulled over on a side road and shut the truck off. After that it wouldn't turn over or anything. I've heard it could be the oil pump or it could be the oil strainer caught some trash. What Do you think it could be? Thanks

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